Can the tap Pipeline Survive The Italian referendum Results?

Can the tap Pipeline Survive The Italian referendum Results?

On december 4, a referendum in italy rejected the sweeping constitutional reforms proposed by the government, ultimately resulting in the resignation of Matteo Renzi from the prime minister’s post. one of the most proposed constitutional changes was the division of competences between the state and the regions on defining that governing body can retain the legislative power on “land-use planning” and “transport and distribution of energy.” according to Article 117 of Italy’s constitution, legislative authority on these specific problems is vested with the regions. Thus, the state was seeking to gain an exclusive legislative power on the problem of “production, transport and distribution of energy,” and therefore, on the question of launching the construction of the Trans-Adriatic Pipeline’s (TAP) in italy. By 2020, tap is expected to bring 10 bcm of natural gas from azerbaijan to the coast of italy, close to the city of Melendugno in the puglia region, via Greece, albania and the adriatic sea.

The faucet consortium has awarded Italian companies a contract for engineering and construction work for the onshore/offshore sections of the pipeline in italy and for the pipeline-receiving terminal to connect TAP to the Italian Snam-Rete-Gas’s pipeline network. the construction of the pipeline in greece and albania had been already launched (EDM, June 16). the method was going smoothly, till tap faced strong defiance from the native authorities of Italy’s puglia region on the basis of environmental concerns. The opposition to the project came despite the fact that the Italian minister of environment had already signed the necessary decree of environmental compatibility of the project—following an extensive environmental impact study—and Italy’s ministry of economy had granted the single authorisation permit for the pipeline in 2015 (Tap-ag.com). However, under Italy’s constitution, the regional governments have a veto power over land use and prospective energy infrastructure. The national government under Matteo Renzi has strongly supported tap. However, Michele Emiliano, the governor of puglia, voiced opposition to the planned pipeline path along Melendugno, by accusing the government of implementing the project without the region’s consent. Emiliano demanded moving the construction to Puglia’s port city of brindisi, wherever there is an available connection to the Snam’s national gas grid.